Hallesches Haus, Berlin


Roast. Wine. Records

Hallesches Haus

25/09/16

from 1pm onwards



Join us for an afternon of Roast, Wine & Records!

Alan Micks, Head Chef at Michelberger Hotel on Warschauer Straße (Berlin) wil be cooking up a Sunday Roast Dinner on the 25th September at Hallesches Haus.

VinaLupa Wine Bar - all afternoon, we will be pouring of selection of wine from small, lesser known producers as well as fine wine from iconic and desired estates.

Records - Adam Purnell will be playing slow disco, boogie, funk and rare groove throughout the afternoon into the early evening.

VinaLupa at The Cooking Shed.



On July 22nd, The Cooking Shed and Emily have put together an exclusive evening of wine tasting. Kickin' off at 8pm with welcome drinks, followed by an hours talk from Emily. She will use four wines to demonstrat the basics of how to taste wine and omre importantly how to choose a wine that will complement your meals at home or when dining out. All wine will be accompanied by cheese and meat boards sourced from local suppliers with homemade chutneys from The Cooking Shed.

To book tickets: click here

The Cooking Shed

The Cooking Shed is owned and run by self-taught cook and food writer, Regan Anderton. Regan works with a team of award-winning local suppliers to ensure high quality welfare standard and sustainable products are used in all dishes created there.

Two years ago Regan brought her son into the world and she quickly realised that food wasn't there purely for enjoyment, but also played an important role in our development and ongoing quality of life. With so many diets, media hype and misinformed nutrition and health advice, as well as the constant rising price of food, Regan started to feel that feeding a family had become a complicated, uninspiring minefield.

She realised that the teaching of kitchen skills had skipped a generation. With fewer children learning from their families and home economics no longer being an option in many schools, it’s no wonder we don't feel confident enough to experiment and enjoy time in the kitchen on our own - let alone together.

Regan created The Cooking Shed at the end of her garden to go some way to helping to change that. The Shed is intended to provide a haven for food and learning - to experiment, experience and enjoy the amazing flavours and skills that the world of food has to offer. Either on your own, or with your child. It's simply a bunch of people getting together, cooking real food and enjoying real experiences.


UNFILTERED at Super Brick Garage 13 - 16 May 2016


Magnums & motorbikes at UNFILTERED. Sun 15 May 2016.

Magnums & motorbikes at UNFILTERED. Sun 15 May 2016.

Rory from Duck Soup selecting records on Sat 14 May 2016.

Rory from Duck Soup selecting records on Sat 14 May 2016.

Emily Harman opening up a Jeroboam of Bellugue Rose. Sat 14 May 2016.

Emily Harman opening up a Jeroboam of Bellugue Rose. Sat 14 May 2016.

Sat 14 May 2016

Sat 14 May 2016

Gemma and Libby getting ready for action on Sat 14 May 2016.

Gemma and Libby getting ready for action on Sat 14 May 2016.

Busy Sunday afternoon at UNFILTERED. Sun 15 May 2016.

Busy Sunday afternoon at UNFILTERED. Sun 15 May 2016.

Amit Patel of Brilliant Corners playing music on Sun 15 May 2016.

Amit Patel of Brilliant Corners playing music on Sun 15 May 2016.

Friday evening off to a busy start. Fri 13 May 2016.

Friday evening off to a busy start. Fri 13 May 2016.

Emily Harman (VinaLupa) & Mark Andrew (Noble Rot)

Emily Harman (VinaLupa) & Mark Andrew (Noble Rot)

Winemaker Vincent Wallard dancing on Mon 16 May 2016.

Winemaker Vincent Wallard dancing on Mon 16 May 2016.

Beautiful Donna of Brilliant Corners playing music on Mon 16 May 2016.

Beautiful Donna of Brilliant Corners playing music on Mon 16 May 2016.

Busy balmy start to the night. Mon 16 May 2016.

Busy balmy start to the night. Mon 16 May 2016.

Emily Harman and winemaker Tom Shobbrook. Mon 16 May 2016.

Emily Harman and winemaker Tom Shobbrook. Mon 16 May 2016.

Magnum sabrage with Emily Harman. Sat 14 May 2016.

Magnum sabrage with Emily Harman. Sat 14 May 2016.

Busy bar. Fri 13 May 2016.

Busy bar. Fri 13 May 2016.

Set up and ready to go. Fri 13 May 2016.

Set up and ready to go. Fri 13 May 2016.

Magnum enjoyment on Fri 13 May 2016.

Magnum enjoyment on Fri 13 May 2016.

Jan Hugel of Wild Things (Berlin) & Mark Andrew of Noble Rot (London) pouring wine on Sun 15 May 2016.

Jan Hugel of Wild Things (Berlin) & Mark Andrew of Noble Rot (London) pouring wine on Sun 15 May 2016.

Magum enjoyment on Sat 14 May 2016.

Magum enjoyment on Sat 14 May 2016.

Busy Saturday night - Sat 14 May 2016.

Busy Saturday night - Sat 14 May 2016.

Winemakers Anton Van Klopper of Lucy Margaux Wines (centre) and Sean O'Callaghan of Riecine (right) on Mon 16 May 2016.

Winemakers Anton Van Klopper of Lucy Margaux Wines (centre) and Sean O'Callaghan of Riecine (right) on Mon 16 May 2016.

Kicking off on Fri 13 May 2016

Kicking off on Fri 13 May 2016

Mark Andrew of Noble Rot, pouring wine for us on Sun 15 May 2016

Mark Andrew of Noble Rot, pouring wine for us on Sun 15 May 2016

Busy outdoors. Sun 15 May 2016.

Busy outdoors. Sun 15 May 2016.

Magnum enjoyment. Sun 15 May 2016

Magnum enjoyment. Sun 15 May 2016


Pastificio Wine Events



Cafe Murano and the Pastificio opened their doors on Tavistock Street in Covent Garden this July. The wine offering has been curated by Emily in both the restaurant and wine shop/deli. This october kicks off the start of a series of wine events to be held at the Pastificio, some of which are hosted by Emily, others are lead by the wine producers themselves.

If you would like book yourself a ticket or know more - please click below:

October 19th - Italian Wine & Cheese Pairing with Emily Harman

October 27th - Meet the Winemaker: Fabbrica di San Martino & Tutto Wines

November 24th - Meet the Winemaker: Lamoresca & Tutto Wines

December 9th - Italian Sparkling Wines with Emily Harman


Interview with Ali Finch

ali.jpg

Ali aged 25, has a wealth of knowledge and experience. Previously Assistant Head Sommelier at Michelin starred Murano, she is now Assistant Beverage Manager at Cubbitt House. Her approach to wine is dynamic, warm and well informed.

When did you first begin working with wine?

I had been working part-time for various hospitality companies during my last 2 years at university and after a post-graduation jolly around Australia - with my newly awarded WSET level 2 – I managed to sneak a job as a commis sommelier at Murano.

Marc-Andrea Levy and Bastien Ferreri whipped my arse in to some kind of service shape and after 2 years I became assistant head.

Within my first couple of weeks the restaurant hosted a special dinner with Jean-Charles Abbatucci and it was my first glimpse into just how much I could learn there, if I could only put up with the Frenchmen long enough.

How would you describe your style of service?

Over-excitable.

Guests know more about food and wine than ever before thanks to all the new openings, cheaper global travel, the number of television shows etc. and will not accept being talked down to.

The easiest way to engage someone enough that they trust your recommendations is through passion - for the wine, for the producer – and a genuine desire to fulfil the guest's needs.

Please can you describe an inspired wine moment?

Drinking what was probably the last bottle in existence of the mythical Els Jelipins White 2006 (from her neighbour’s old vines that were scrubbed up the following year) at the estate with some of my closest friends. It was an incredibly special day.

What advice/knowledge would you pass on to anyone who aspires to work with wine?

Taste lots and ask as many questions as you can.

Try to trust your own palate – we can only ever attempt to understand a wine through our own perception so if you like or don't like something, that's ok.

What do you think affects the experience of a guest the most (other than the wine itself)?

Some kind of backstory. We're emotional beings and it's beneficial to have something other than a physical reaction to a wine.

Lots of wine is technically well-made, emotion helps to distinguish what you want to drink or sell on a regular basis.

If you were to champion anything, what would it be? (e.g. region, grape, style etc)

I'm a bit of a sucker for Cabernet Franc

What do you enjoy most about the work that you do?

Watching that light go on when a guest or member of staff tastes a wine for the first time and they form an instant connection with it.

And obviously terrorising MAL(Mark Andrea Levy)…

What would be your wine choice in the following situations…

Desert Island?

Clos Rougeard "Les Poyeaux" - though it would be drunk quickly, before I burnt to a crisp

Picnic wine?

"Le Vallon", Henri Milan - in magnum, obviously!

Relaxation?

Vincent Dancer’s Bourgogne Blanc  

Party Wine?

"Le Mont Benoit" by Emmanuel Brochet for some classy bubbles

Tell us your wine secret….

If there’s nothing good on offer, drink gin.

Interview with Fergus Muirhead

Fergus, aged 25, is the head sommelier at Aberdeen Street Social in Hong Kong. He believes in sourcing honest wines that are made with care and more importantly delicious.

When did you first begin working with wine?

I first seriously started working in wine when I moved to London - I was 21.  This is where I met the most important mentor in my career, my first head sommelier Raphael Rodriguez (who is now Head Sommelier at Fera at Claridges).

How would you describe your style of service?

Informal (possibly too much at times) and unpretentious. I’m lucky as I have only worked with unpretentious somms so I have never been corrupted.

Please can you describe an inspired wine moment?

The first wine tasting I experienced in London. Up to that point, I had only tasted conventional mass produced wines. When I met Raph we had a tasting with Kate Tahl. We tasted wines from Thierry Puzelat for the most part. Simple wines but they opened my eyes to what true wines could taste like. Since that moment I have tasted wines that were more impressive but that experience has really stayed with me.

What advice/knowledge would you pass on to anyone who aspires to work with wine?

Taste, taste, taste, take notes and taste.

If you don’t taste then there is no way you can be successful in this industry. It is the best way to improve your knowledge and palate. Also network as much as possible. All of the people I met at London helped me along my career and in essence they assisted me to attain the position I have now. It is also amazing to taste and drink with friends and to get their opinion.

What do you think affects the experience of a guest the most (other than the wine itself)?

The glassware. There was an amazing tasting conducted by Daniel Primack (at that point he ran Around Wine/Eurocave UK) and it was truly eye opening. We had the opportunity to taste the same wine in two different wine glasses - the differences were spectacular. Daniel is the best person I have met to talk to when it comes to what can affect the experience of the guest.

If you were to champion anything, what would it be? (e.g. region, grape, style etc)

I feel really excited about what is happening in the States at the moment. The way in which the scene has changed is spectacular.

But mainly I am trying to promote wines that have been made with love, soul and taste authentic. There is nothing wrong with conventional wines but I get very little pleasure from those wines

What do you enjoy most about the work that you do?

I meet some of the most amazing people and it has opened doors that other jobs would not have. I have managed to move half way around the world, which in something that is not always possible in other industries.

What would be your wine choice in the following situations…

Desert Island? A palette of  wine from Anton Von Klopper (Domaine Lucci/Lucy Margaux) and Tom Shobbrook (Shobbrook Wines/Didi).

Picnic wine?  Riesling from Binner. Easy going, light and fresh.

Relaxation? When I need to relax - I turn to beer. The one thing I miss in Hong Kong is the craft beer that you are able to get in London, in particular the beers from Brew by Numbers.

Party Wine? Something Pet Nat - fun and easy to drink!

Tell us your wine secret….

White wine comes before red wine is bollocks.

Eastern Scene by Emily Harman

 
nagano.

As I write this, I sit on a Japanese high speed train known as Shinkansen or Bullet Train. I have spent a week eating and drinking around Tokyo and several days in Kyoto. Today I leave Kyoto to go north to Nagano to the mountains to take a few restorative days in the snow and quiet and hopefully I will catch a glimpse of a snow monkey or two, before returning back to Tokyo for another week. This trip is my second to Japan and is far from being my last.

Being a closed country for so many years means that Japan has kept hold of it’s unique identity and shows little influence of other places. Tokyo is a city with so much to give that it guarantees that you will never be bored and you will 99% of the time, eat incredibly well and often at surprisingly reasonable prices.

This years trip was organised around an incredibly special restaurant reservation. I had managed to attain a seat at one of the most elusive pop ups of recent years, Noma at the Mandarin Oriental in Tokyo. This meant I would get to eat the food of one of my favourite restaurants, in the worlds most exciting city – to say I was exciting, was an understatement.

With the help of several foodies, sommeliers and wine writers – I have been lucky enough to acquire an eating and drinking list that could keep any serious foodie occupied for months. I have been eating bowls of Ramen and handmade cold Soba noodles for under a tenner for lunch and making my way around as much wine, martinis and sake as I can in the evenings.

I really want to use this trip to explore the wine scene here. I have learnt through my travels that everything in this marvellous country is well thought out to an incredibly high standard. Food, drink and the way in which these are served to you are considered and worked at to the point of perfection. Wine and the experiences with it seem to be no exception.

Stay tuned for more on wine in Japan….